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Physical & Decompression Therapy For Low Back Pain

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Introduction

Throughout the entire world, the body is in constant motion and has to have the ability to do everyday movements. For the body, the back and the spine make sure that the body is upright, can do certain things like bend and twist, and even do everyday activities. When the back and spine get injured, it can cause unwanted symptoms like low back pain to occur and if not treated right away, it can turn into chronic low back pain over time. Sometimes the injuries could also be due to other factors that are ordinary actions like poor posture, lifting heavy objects, or overusing the soft tissues in the lower back can cause low back pain to occur and hinder a person. Fortunately, there are treatments that can help alleviate low back pain and reduce the pain that the person is in. Today’s article looks at how physical and decompression therapy can help alleviate low back pain and get back a person’s quality of life. By referring patients to qualified and skilled providers specializing in spinal decompression therapy. To that end, and when appropriate, we advise our patients to refer to our associated medical providers based on their examination. We find that education is the key to asking valuable questions to our providers. Dr. Alex Jimenez DC provides this information as an educational service only. Disclaimer

 

Can my insurance cover it? Yes, it may. If you are uncertain, here is the link to all the insurance providers we cover. If you have any questions, please call Dr. Jimenez at 915-850-0900.

How Does Physical Therapy Help With Low Back Pain?

Ever feel muscle tightness around your lower back? How about a dull ache when you wake up and stretch? How about muscle strain from your torso when you are bent over working at your desk? This could be low back pain, and some treatments can help alleviate low back pain as research has stated that low back is common for many individuals worldwide at some point in their lives and is the most expensive to treat. When individuals suffer from low back pain, it causes them to miss out on work and try to find ways to alleviate low back pain. Luckily treatments like physical therapy can help alleviate low back pain and allow individuals to prevent it. 

 

Incorporating physical therapy as part of recovery for low back pain is beneficial for many individuals that want to strengthen their back muscles. Research studies have found that individuals suffering from low back pain will go to physical therapy to alleviate the pain symptoms and increase the functionality of the back. Utilizing physical therapy for individuals suffering from low back pain can help strengthen the surrounding muscles on the back and provide less stress on the spine’s disc and joints since it is a non-surgical treatment. Other research studies have found that when individuals suffering from chronic low back pain do physical therapy, the exercises used to improve the back muscles can help produce a considerable reduction in low back disability and pain.

 

How Does Spinal Decompression Help With Low Back Pain?

As part of the various non-surgical therapies out there to help alleviate low back pain, spinal decompression can help reduce the symptoms of low back pain for many suffering individuals. Like chiropractic therapy and physical therapy, spinal decompression helps relax the tense back muscles and ligaments and decompresses the spinal discs on the spine. Research studies have shown that spinal decompression helps decrease the intensity of low back pain symptoms by reducing the back’s disability to function, increasing its endurance, and even improving the lumbar muscles’ range of motion. Incorporating spinal decompression can even help reduce symptoms of other issues that are associated with low back pain, like sciaticaherniated discs, DDD (degenerative disc disease), and pinched nerves.

 


Spinal Decompression & Low Back Pain-Video

Does twisting your body from side to side feel sore? How about feeling a dull, mild ache on your lower back when you bend over to pick something up? Or how about feeling numbness or a tingling sensation that travels from the lower back down to the feet? You might be experiencing low back pain, and spinal decompression may be the answer to alleviate these symptoms. The video above shows and explains how the DRX9000, a spinal decompression machine, is used to help individuals suffering from lower back pain. Spinal decompression does to the lower back is that it incorporates traction when a person lays down on the DRX9000 and is strapped in. This allows the person’s spine to be gently stretched and causes the compressed spinal discs to take pressure off the nerve roots spread out throughout the spine. This treatment provides instant relief to the back and spine while the necessary nutrients traveling throughout the body return to the spine to re-hydrate the spinal discs. Suppose you want to learn more about how decompression therapy can benefit you. In that case, this link will explain what spinal decompression therapy does to help reduce low back pain.


How Physical & Decompression Alleviate Low Back Pain Together?

 

Since mostly everybody suffers from low back pain at some point, it can develop into chronic low back pain when it is not treated right away. If it progresses gradually, it can cause degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis and cause many issues for the individual. Fortunately, low back pain treatments that are non-surgical can help the lower back and reduce the symptoms. Since physical and decompression therapy work together to alleviate low back pain, research studies have found that combining these two can reduce low back pain in many individuals. It is essential to know that after doing a spinal decompression treatment, it is best to wait for a few weeks before getting back into physical therapy. This allows the spine to recuperate before doing an intense workout out. However, research studies showed that combined physical and decompression treatment reduces the pain and disability of chronic pain on the lumbar discs for individuals.

 

Conclusion

Overall, the combination of physical and decompression therapy can help many individuals suffering from low back pain. Each of the treatments alone can treat low back pain symptoms and reduce the pain, but when combined, it can help with the longevity of the spine and back muscles. Having low back pain is common for many individuals and can cause them to go to their primary physicians to get time off work. Utilizing non-surgical treatments for low back pain allows individuals to get their lives back together pain-free.

 

References

Amjad, Fareeha, et al. “Effects of Non-Surgical Decompression Therapy in Addition to Routine Physical Therapy on Pain, Range of Motion, Endurance, Functional Disability and Quality of Life versus Routine Physical Therapy Alone in Patients with Lumbar Radiculopathy; a Randomized Controlled Trial.” BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, BioMed Central, 16 Mar. 2022, https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8924735/.

Casiano, Vincent E, et al. “Back Pain – Statpearls – NCBI Bookshelf.” StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL), StatPearls Publishing, 22 Feb. 2022, https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK538173/.

Dickerman, Rob. “Physical Therapy for Low Back Pain Relief.” Spine, Spine-Health, 20 Dec. 2005, https://www.spine-health.com/treatment/physical-therapy/physical-therapy-low-back-pain-relief.

F;, Gaowgzeh RAM;Chevidikunnan MF;BinMulayh EA;Khan. “Effect of Spinal Decompression Therapy and Core Stabilization Exercises in Management of Lumbar Disc Prolapse: A Single Blind Randomized Controlled Trial.” Journal of Back and Musculoskeletal Rehabilitation, U.S. National Library of Medicine, 2020, https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/31282394/.

Hoffman, Haydn, et al. “Minimally Invasive Decompression and Physiotherapy for Lumbar Spinal Stenosis in Geriatric Patients.” Cureus, Cureus, 11 June 2018, https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6089476/.

Maher, C G. “Effective Physical Treatment for Chronic Low Back Pain.” The Orthopedic Clinics of North America, U.S. National Library of Medicine, Jan. 2004, https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/15062718/.

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