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How To Alleviate Posterolateral Herniation With Decompression Therapy

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Introduction

All around the world, everybody suffers from low back pain at some point in their lives. Due to strenuous activities, injuries, or accidents that cause strain on the back, many individuals will feel a wide range of symptoms that are caused by low back pain. From a dull, mild ache to a sudden, sharp, throbbing pain can hinder a person’s quality of life. This is due to disc herniation on the spine and can cause painful symptoms to pop up over time if it is not treated. Luckily there are treatments for spinal disc herniation that can improve the quality of life for a person. In, today’s article, we will be taking a look at posterolateral herniation, its symptoms, and how prone decompression therapy can help alleviate posterolateral herniation for many suffering individuals. By referring patients to qualified and skilled providers specializing in spinal decompression therapy. To that end, and when appropriate, we advise our patients to refer to our associated medical providers based on their examination. We find that education is the key to asking valuable questions to our providers. Dr. Alex Jimenez DC provides this information as an educational service only. Disclaimer

 

Can my insurance cover it? Yes, it may. If you are uncertain, here is the link to all the insurance providers we cover. If you have any questions, please call Dr. Jimenez at 915-850-0900.

What Is Posterolateral Herniation?

Do you ever feel discomfort in your back from staying in a position for too long? How about your lower back feeling tender to the touch when you are getting examined by your primary physician? Or how about feeling a wide variety of painful symptoms that can cause you to constantly lay down all day to get rid of the pain? You could be suffering from posterolateral herniation. Research studies have stated that when the inside of the spinal disc known as the nucleus pulposus is injured, it can protrude out to where the spinal nerve roots and the spinal cord are and compress them to cause the individual to be in pain. This will cause the spinal disc to be herniated, which usually happens during a spinal injury. It compresses the lowest spinal nerve root for posterolateral herniation to occur.

 

Posterolateral herniation usually occurs around the lumbar and cervical spine more than the thoracic spine. Other research studies have found that when posterolateral herniation occurs, it is due to the annulus fibrosis, which is the outer layer of the spinal disc, losing its integrity, causing the nucleus pulposus to protrude out compress the spinal nerve. Since the pressure is on the lumbar spinal nerve, research studies have also found that when the annulus fibrosis becomes thin on the posterolateral, it causes the nucleus pulposus to compress the nearest nerve root and causes the lack of support to the posterior ligaments on the spine.

 

The Symptoms Of Posterolateral Herniation

The symptoms of posterolateral herniation usually vary on how severe the pain is on the person, and where it is located plays a factor. For the lumbar spine, research studies have stated that the signs and symptoms of posterolateral herniation on the lumbar spine can cause sensory abnormalities, weakness in the lumbosacral nerve roots, and restricted flexion. When this happens, the person suffers from lower levels of disability, leg pain, and pain in the posterior knee. For the cervical spine, more research studies have stated that posterolateral cervical herniation on the cervical spine can cause ipsilateral pain to the neck, which can be dull or sharp. While also causes direct compression of the spinal cord and causes inflammation of the cervical nerve root creating numbness or tingling sensation down the arms and fingers.


Prone Decompression Therapy-Video

Feeling discomfort in your back after staying in a position for too long? How about feeling pain in your lower back, legs, and neck? Is the pain a dull, mild ache or a sudden, sharp nuisance? If you are experiencing any of these symptoms, then decompression therapy might be the answer you are looking for. The video above explains how decompression therapy can help alleviate the symptoms caused by posterolateral herniation on the spine. Decompression therapy utilizes traction to gently stretch the spine to take the pressure off the nerve root and decompress the herniated discs. This will allow the spinal disc to increase its height on the spine and allow the inner walls of the discs that are herniated to return to their original form. If you want to learn more about decompression therapy, this link will explain its benefits and how it can alleviate posterolateral herniation symptoms.


How Prone Decompression Therapy Alleviates Posterolateral Herniation

 

Since posterolateral herniation is primarily located in the lumbar spine, studies have stated that the loss of hydration and collapse of discs causes a strain on the fibers of the annulus fibrosis, making them become herniated and causing tears and fissures. When there are protrusions and herniations on the spine, prone decompression therapy can help alleviate those symptoms and help restore the spine. Research studies have found that prone decompression therapy allows more of a noticeable separation on the intervertebral discs and causes a decrease in muscle tension as well. With prone decompression, the posterolateral herniation will decrease since it takes the pressure off the nerve roots, causing the person to be in pain. 

 

Conclusion

Overall, everybody has dealt with low back pain at some point. With a wide range of symptoms associated with low back pain, posterolateral herniation on the spine can cause many problems like pain, numbness, and tension on the nerve roots, ligaments, and muscles encompassing the spine. With prone decompression therapy, it can help relieve the herniated disc by taking it off the nerve root and alleviating the painful symptoms. Prone decompression therapy gently stretches the spine to return nutrients and oxygen to the compressed herniated discs. This allows many individuals suffering from herniated discs to feel instant relief and get back their quality of life.

 

References

De Cicco, Franco L, and Gaston O Camino Willhuber. “Nucleus Pulposus Herniation – Statpearls – NCBI Bookshelf.” In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL), StatPearls Publishing, 11 Aug. 2021, https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK542307/.

Al Qaraghi, Mustafa I, and Orlando De Jesus. “Lumbar Disc Herniation- StatPearls- NCBI Bookshelf.” In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL), StatPearls Publishing, 30 Aug. 2021, https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK560878/.

Amin, Raj M, et al. “Lumbar Disc Herniation.” Current Reviews in Musculoskeletal Medicine, Springer US, Dec. 2017, https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5685963/.

Dydyk, Alexander M, et al. “Disc Herniation – Statpearls – NCBI Bookshelf.” In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL): StatPearls Publishing, 18 Jan. 2022, https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK441822/.

Khan, Rehan Ramzan, et al. “Effectiveness of Mechanical Traction in Supine versus Prone Lying Position for Lumbosacral Radiculopathy.” Pakistan Journal of Medical Sciences, Professional Medical Publications, 2021, https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8377889/.

Schoenfeld, Andrew J, and Bradley K Weiner. “Treatment of Lumbar Disc Herniation: Evidence-Based Practice.” International Journal of General Medicine, Dove Medical Press, 21 July 2010, https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2915533/.

Yeung, Jacky T, et al. “Cervical Disc Herniation Presenting with Neck Pain and Contralateral Symptoms: A Case Report.” Journal of Medical Case Reports, BioMed Central, 28 June 2012, https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3411405/.

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