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More Evidence On Medical Uses Of HCTP | Part 2

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Introduction

When unwanted pathogens are attacking the body, it can cause many chronic illnesses and can damage the cells, organs, and tissues. However, through the usage of human cellular tissue products or HCTPs through affiliated clinics, they can help replenish the damaged cells through regeneration and can even help alleviate some of the symptoms that were causing the body pain. In this 2 part series, we will be taking a more in-depth look at HCTP and how its beneficial properties can help dampen the effects of chronic diseases. Part 1 took a look at what is HCTP and how it can help treat chronic illnesses. By referring patients to qualified and skilled providers that specialized in regenerative cellular therapy, we work with affiliated clinics and distributor organizations, both internationally and nationally with the services that we offer. We find that education is the key to asking valuable questions to our providers. Dr. Jimenez DC provides this information as an educational service only. Disclaimer

 

Can my insurance cover it? Yes, in case you are uncertain here is the link to all the insurance providers we cover. If you have any questions, please call Dr. Jimenez at 915-850-0900.

 

What Is HCTP?

 

Human cellular tissue products or HCTP is the proper term for regenerative medicine. Studies have shown that HCTP has become a promising form of medicine as it aims to help repair and replace damaged cells, tissues, and organs, while bringing them back to a normal function in the body. Not only that but research shows that HCTP are unspecialized cells of the human body that can differentiate into any cells in the body while having the ability to self-renewal.

 

More Medical Evidence Of HCTP

With more and more studies of HCTP and its beneficial properties, it shows that HCTP has the ability to build tissue in the body but also has amazing therapeutic uses in tissue regeneration and repair. Granted only affiliated clinics and distribution organizations (both nationally and internationally) uses HCTP in their practices, the results speak to themselves as HCTP has provided many benefits to some of the most common cases of chronic illnesses and symptoms that the body endures. And with HCTP, it can even help dampen the effects as well.

 

HCTP & IBD

It is accepted that IBD is caused by an attack on the gut microbiota itself, due to an alteration of the immune response in a person with a genetic predisposition; therefore, treatment has focused on the control of inflammation and normalization of the immune system. This is why HCTP has been used to treat this condition as studies have shown that the usage of HCTP, can help reset the immune system and attenuate the abnormal inflammatory response in IBD patients.  Other studies also show that HCTP therapy is well tolerated and establishes minimal side effects for patients dealing with IBD. In Crohn’s disease (CD), which is a classic inflammatory bowel disease, it has been found that the infusion of allogeneic HCTP is safe and more effective than conventional treatment. In fact, the infusion of HCTP is safe and effective in the treatment of CD, including the severe perianal form.

 

HCTP & Malignant Hematic Diseases

Since HCTP can be used to help regenerate cells and tissues in the body, it’s only fair that it can help restore the cellular structure inside bone marrow. Studies have found that HCTP has the ability to restore the cellular components of the blood for bone marrow transplants to dampen the effects of malignant hematic diseases. Among malignant blood diseases, in which it is known that allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation significantly reduces the risk of relapse and death, unfortunately, many patients who need an HCTP transplant do not find a compatible donor or do not get a good response, so it became necessary to explore other alternatives. Cells from the umbilical cord tissue are currently the source of HCTP richer, more accessible, less expensive, and with less risk of inducing rejection, which makes this a subtype of HCTP in the most promising and safe source for the cells.

 

On the other hand, the most common complication in patients undergoing some transplants is graft-versus-host disease, known as “graft rejection,” which can affect any organ and occur suddenly or slowly; some medications may reduce the risk, but the incidence of rejection remains high. Because HCTP regulates the immune response, the use of such cells in patients undergoing a solid organ transplants and blood cells for malignant blood diseases has been investigated. Current evidence shows a clear trend in favor of HCTP, with respect to the risk of relapse and survival of patients. Although the evidence is still not considered conclusive, a clear trend in favor of HCTP is established, with respect to the risk of relapse and survival of patients.

 

HCTP & Neurodegenerative Diseases

Neurodegenerative diseases actually occur when the brain’s nerve cells start to lose function over time. Research shows that there are treatments that can help relieve some of the mental symptoms that are associated with neurodegenerative diseases and in recent years there has been great interest in establishing the role of HCTP therapies in several neurodegenerative diseases and more than in the differentiation to neurons and the replacement of dead neurons. Research has found that HCTP therapy can help regenerate the neural tissues that have been damaged from neurodegenerative diseases. This means that HCTP injections can help replenish the cellular structure and dampen the effects of neurodegenerative diseases like Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and Huntington’s diseases.  The safety and effectiveness of stem cell-based regenerative medicine for the treatment of multiple sclerosis has reached such a level of evidence that recently the American Society for Bone Marrow and Blood. HCTP transplants have been recommended to include indications of autologous hematopoietic HCTP transplantation, which opens the doors of the clinic to explore the role of HCTP.

 

HCTP & Skin Disorders

 

Chronic skin wounds are often associated with diabetes, obesity, or even inflammatory skin problems. Studies have shown that HCTP possesses unique immunomodulatory properties that are used for treating atopic dermatitis. This is the reason why many people would consider cell therapy as a novel and effective alternative treatment, of course, accompanied by conventional medical and surgical professionals. Regenerative medicine has become a new strategy for facial rejuvenation and filling of unwanted furrows and lines, elimination of scars and signs of acne, vitiligo, among others. Given the regenerative mechanisms of HCTP that have been shown to release factors that promote hair growth and hair regeneration, alopecia has become a target of regenerative medicine, with variable beneficial results and minimal undesirable effects.

Conclusion

Therefore, with more and more research being done with HCTP, the results speak for themselves. Since the body goes through so many situations and can develop chronic illnesses over time, it is important to know that there are many therapeutic ways to help dampen those effects. By changing a lifestyle habit to eating healthy and taking vitamins that fuel the body, it can help dampen those effects and anyone can start feeling better and continuing to live life to the fullest.

 

References

Aly, Riham Mohamed. “Current State of Stem Cell-Based Therapies: An Overview.” Stem Cell Investigation, AME Publishing Company, 15 May 2020, https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7367472/.

Biehl, Jesse K, and Brenda Russell. “Introduction to Stem Cell Therapy.” The Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, U.S. National Library of Medicine, 2009, https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4104807/.

Irhimeh, Mohammad R, and Julian Cooney. “Management of Inflammatory Bowel Disease Using Stem Cell Therapy.” Current Stem Cell Research & Therapy, U.S. National Library of Medicine, 2016, https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/26216128/.

Patel, Shyam A, and Pranela Rameshwar. “Stem Cell Transplantation for Hematological Malignancies: Prospects for Personalized Medicine and Co-Therapy with Mesenchymal Stem Cells.” Current Pharmacogenomics and Personalized Medicine, U.S. National Library of Medicine, 1 Sept. 2011, https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3164538/.

Professionals, NIEHS. “Neurodegenerative Diseases.” National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 16 July 2021, https://www.niehs.nih.gov/research/supported/health/neurodegenerative/index.cfm.

Sakthiswary, Rajalingham, and Azman Ali Raymond. “Stem Cell Therapy in Neurodegenerative Diseases: From Principles to Practice.” Neural Regeneration Research, Medknow Publications & Media Pvt Ltd, 15 Aug. 2012, https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4302533/.

Shimizu, Hiromichi, et al. “Stem Cell-Based Therapy for Inflammatory Bowel Disease.” Intestinal Research, Korean Association for the Study of Intestinal Diseases, July 2019, https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6667367/.

Shin, Tae-Hoon, et al. “Mesenchymal Stem Cell Therapy for Inflammatory Skin Diseases: Clinical Potential and Mode of Action.” International Journal of Molecular Sciences, MDPI, 25 Jan. 2017, https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5343781/.

Zakrzewski, Wojciech, et al. “Stem Cells: Past, Present, and Future.” Stem Cell Research & Therapy, BioMed Central, 26 Feb. 2019, https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6390367/.

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